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Congratulations! Out of the 25 institutions that submitted the 2017 CSD Education Survey by the early deadline, Truman State University was randomly selected for a complimentary registration to the 2018 CAPCSD Conference in Austin, Texas, April 11-14.



Critical Thinking 2016

Critical Thinking as a Knowledge and Skill for Professional Practice

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WHEREAS, most faculty (99%) endorse teaching critical thinking as an important goal of a university education (DeAngelo et al., 2009) and most employers (82%) want educators to place greater emphasis on student outcomes that include critical thinking (Hart Research Associates, 2013).

WHEREAS, the belief that critical thinking will emerge naturally as a by-product from a higher education is based more on wishful thinking than actual evidence (Arum & Roksa, 2010).

WHEREAS, research suggests students are more likely to learn how to think critically when it is taught directly as a set of skills and practiced within a specific knowledge area (Abrami et al., 2015).

WHEREAS, critical thinking is increasingly recognized as an essential knowledge and skill across the helping professions, especially within an evidence-based context where the quality of clinicians’ decision making skills are the foundation for integrating best evidence, clinician expertise, and client preference (e.g., Finn, 2011; Gambrill, 2012; Huang, Newman, & Schwartzstein, 2014; Jenicek, 2006; Kamhi, 2011).

WHEREAS, critical thinking is a core competency of interprofessional education/practice (Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011), and interprofessional education/practice is an emerging priority of our professional association (ASHA, 2015a).

WHEREAS, critical thinking and its complementary dispositions, open-mindedness and fairmindedness, are an important foundation for understanding the perspectives of others and encouraging advocacy for broader social benefits (Barnett, 1997), and intercultural competence and advocacy are integral to our profession’s mission (ASHA, 2015a)

WHEREAS, critical thinking has been identified as a knowledge and skill for clinical doctoral programs in audiology (ACAE, 2005), in the guidelines for the clinical doctorate in speech-language pathology (ASHA, 2015b), and recommended for undergraduate education in communication sciences and disorders (ASHA, 2015c).

WHEREAS, the feasibility of critical thinking as a professional competency should be considered for all of our accredited programs in order to foster true excellence in professional practice.

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders appoint a task force to develop a document that (a) presents the rationale for critical thinking in professional practice, (b) describes the basic elements of critical thinking, (c) outlines different approaches for teaching critical thinking, (d) describes potential tools for assessing students’ critical thinking, (e) suggests methods for helping faculty to develop their knowledge and skills for helping students to think critically, and (f) describes different approaches for incorporating critical thinking into the curriculum. The task force will also consider the viability of critical thinking as a future professional competency. 2

References 

Abrami, P. C., Bernard, R. M., Borokhovski, E., Waddington, D. I., Wade, C. A., & Persson, T. (2015). Strategies for teaching students to think critically: A meta-analysis. Review of Educational Research, 85(2), 275-314.

Accreditation Commission for Audiology Education (2005). Accreditation Standards for the Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) Program. Washington, DC.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) (2015a). Strategic Pathway to Excellence. ASHA, Rockville, MD.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) (2015b). Guidelines for the Clinical Doctorate in Speech-Language Pathology. ASHA, Rockville, MD.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) (2015c). The Role of Undergraduate Education in Communication Sciences and Disorders. ASHA, Rockville, MD.

Arum, R., & Roksa, J. (2011). Academically adrift: Limited learning on college campuses. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Barnett, R. (1997). Higher education: A critical business. Bristol, PA: Open University Press.

DeAngelo, L. (2009). The American college teacher: National norms for the 2007-2008 HERI faculty survey. Higher Education Research Institute.

Finn, P. (2011). Critical thinking: Knowledge and skills for evidence-based Practice. Language, Speech, Hearing Services in Schools, 42(1), 69-72.

Gambrill, E. D. (2012). Critical thinking in clinical practice: Improving the quality of judgments and decisions (3rd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

Hart Research Associates (2013). It takes more than a major: Employer priorities for College learning and student success. American Association for Colleges and Universities.

Huang, G. C., Newman, L. R., & Schwartzstein, R. M. (2014). Critical Thinking in Health Professions Education: Summary and Consensus Statements of the Millennium Conference 2011. Teaching and learning in medicine, 26(1), 95-102.

Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel (2011). Core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice: Report of an expert panel. Washington, D.C.: Interprofessional Education Collaborative.

Jenicek, M. (2006). A physician’s self-paced guide to critical thinking. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association. 3

Kamhi, A. G. (2011). Balancing certainty and uncertainty in clinical practice. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 42(1), 59-64. 4

Primary Sponsor: 

Patrick Finn, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor
Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education
Affiliate faculty, Institute for Evidence-Based Health Professions Education
University of Georgia
pfinn@uga.edu

Co-Sponsors from CAPCSD Member Programs (alphabetical order): 

Kenn Apel, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor and Chair
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
University of South Carolina
KENNAPEL@mailbox.sc.edu

Sandie Bass-Ringdahl, PhD, CCC-A
Clinical Assistant Professor and Program Director
Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education
University of Georgia
sbassrin@uga.edu

Julie Barkmeier-Kramer, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor
School of Medicine
University of Utah
JulieB.Kraemer@hsc.utah.edu

Michael Blomgren, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor and Department Chair
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
University of Utah
Michael.blomgren@Health.utah.edu

Shelley Brundage, PhD, CCC-SLP
Associate Professor and Program Director
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences
The George Washington University
brundage@gwu.edu 5

Kathy Chapman, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor
Director of Graduate Studies
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
University of Utah
kathy.chapman@health.utah.edu

Anthony DiLollo, PhD, CCC-SLP Associate Professor
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Wichita State University
anthony.dilollo@wichita.edu

John Folkins, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Bowling Green State University
folkins@bgsu.edu

Kimberly Frazier, PhD, CCC-SLP
Graduate Coordinator
Department of Communication Disorders
University of Arkansas
kimfraz@uark.edu

Cheryl D. Gunter, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor and Chairperson
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
West Chester University
cgunter@wcupa.edu

Kellyn Dailey Hall, PhD, CCC/SLP
Associate Professor
Department of Social Work and Communication Sciences and Disorders
Longwood University
hallkd@longwood.edu

Adrienne Hancock, PhD, CCC-SLP
Associate Professor
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences
The George Washington University
hancock@gwu.edu 6

Jeff Higginbotham, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor and Chair
Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
cdsjeff@buffalo.edu

Jeannette Hoit, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor
Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
University of Arizona
hoit@email.arizona.edu

Jessica Huber, PhD
Professor
Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Purdue University
jhuber@purdue.edu

Laura Justice, PhD
Adjunct Professor, Speech and Hearing
EHE Distinguished Professor, Teaching and Learning Administration
CCEC Executive Director of the Crane Center for Early Childhood Research, and The Schoenbaum Family Center
The Ohio State University
justice.57@osu.edu

Alan Kamhi, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
agkamhi@uncg.edu

Gail Kempster, PhD, CCC-SLP
Associate Professor and Program Director
Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences
Rush University
gail_b_kempster@rush.edu

Ray D. Kent, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus
Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
kent@waisman.wisc.edu 7

Colleen Le Prell, PhD
Program Head
Emilie and Phil Schepps Professorship in Hearing Science
Callier Center for Communication Disorders
University of Texas at Dallas
colleen.leprell@utdallas.edu

Michelle Mentis, PhD, CCC-SLP
Clinical Professor and Program Director
Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences
Boston University
mmentis@bu.edu

Richard Morris, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor
School of Communication Science and Disorders
Florida State University
Richard.Morris@ccsi.fsu.edu

Tom Muller, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA
Clinical Associate Professor
Coordinator of Clinical Education: Audiology
Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences
University of Arizona
mulltert@email.arizona.edu

Carol Ann Raymond, MS, CCC-SLP
Clinic Director
Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education
University of Georgia
raymond1@uga.edu

Barbara Rodriguez, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor and Chair
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences
University of New Mexico
brodrig@unm.edu

Julie Scherz, PhD, CCC-SLP Associate Professor and Chair
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Wichita State University
julie.scherz@wichita.edu 8

Glen Tellis, PhD, BCS-F, CCC-SLP
Professor and Chair
Department of Speech-Language Pathology
Misericordia University
gtellis@misericordia.edu

Teresa Ukrainetz, PhD, CCC-SLP Professor
Division of Communication Disorders
University of Wyoming, Laramie
tukraine@uwyo.edu