Feedback in the Clinical Education Environment

Feedback is a critical component of the clinical education process in audiology and speech-language pathology. Through high-quality and dynamic readings, multimedia offerings and reflective activities, participants will gain a richer understanding of the principles and practice of effective feedback, with specific emphasis on evidence-based approaches to delivering feedback in the clinical learning environment.


Module 1: The Importance of Feedback in the Clinical Education Process

This module will provide you with an understanding of the importance of feedback in the clinical education process in speech-language pathology and audiology graduate programs. You will explore different definitions and types of feedback, reflect on your experience with it, and self-assess your skill level for providing feedback. You will make use of several technology tools that will bring participants together in a learning community despite this course’s self-paced format. You will also use the Participant Workbook that accompanies this module to help you reflect on what you have learned and strategize ways to take action. Lastly, you will take a short quiz to check your learning.

After taking the course, participants will be able to:

1, Define what is meant by feedback as it relates to clinical education.

2. Describe the roles that both the clinical educator and the student play in the feedback process.

3. Explain the standards/expectations associated with supervision in graduate clinical education programs and what role feedback plays in these.

Disclosures

Carol Cokely

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.

Non-Financial

None

Gina Tillard

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.  Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None

Kate Cook

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None.

Cheryl Messick

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Pittsburg.  At times receives compensation as a presenter/author in various venues on clinical education topics.

Non-Financial

Was a member of the CAPCSD board during course development.

ASHA CEU Credit

ASHA CEU Brand Block

 

 

 

 

This course is offered for 0.25 ASHA CEUs (Introductory level, Related area)

Module 2: Feedback vs. Evaluation

 

This module will describe and differentiate between the feedback and evaluation processes, and in particular, their relationship to formative and summative assessment. Understanding and identifying the differences between feedback and evaluation will allow you to better guide your students and help improve their performance. You will make use of several technology tools that will bring participants together in a learning community despite this course’s self-paced format. You will also use the Participant Workbook that accompanies this module to help you reflect on what you have learned and strategize ways to take action. Lastly, you will take a short quiz to check your learning.

After taking the course, participants will be able to:

1. Define what is meant by evaluation as it relates to clinical education.

2. Describe the difference between the feedback and evaluation processes.

3. Explain the relationships between feedback, evaluation, formative and summative assessments in clinical education.

Disclosures

Carol Cokely

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.

Non-Financial

None

Gina Tillard

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.  Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None

Kate Cook

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None.

Cheryl Messick

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Pittsburg.  At times receives compensation as a presenter/author in various venues on clinical education topics.

Non-Financial

Was a member of the CAPCSD board during course development.

ASHA CEU Credit

ASHA CEU Brand Block

 

 

 

 

This course is offered for 0.25 ASHA CEUs (Introductory level, Related area)

Module 3: Feedback Strategies

 

This module will take a deeper look at the application of appropriate feedback strategies based on setting and levels of performance or competence. Some different types of feedback strategies that will be investigated include delayed vs. immediate feedback, verbal vs. written feedback, and specific vs. general feedback. In addition, the concept of balanced feedback that incorporates both areas to improve and those that are being done well will be discussed.

After taking the course, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the types of feedback that may be appropriate in a clinical education setting.

2. Articulate strategies for providing effective feedback and evaluation to students in clinical practice.

Disclosures

Carol Cokely

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.

Non-Financial

None

Gina Tillard

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.  Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None

Kate Cook

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None.

Cheryl Messick

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Pittsburg.  At times receives compensation as a presenter/author in various venues on clinical education topics.

Non-Financial

Was a member of the CAPCSD board during course development.

ASHA CEU Credit

ASHA CEU Brand Block

 

 

 

 

This course is offered for 0.25 ASHA CEUs (Introductory level, Related area)

Module 4: Creating an Environment Receptive to Feedback

 

This module will investigate how to employ effective interpersonal skills and communication strategies to create an environment where clinical educators provide feedback in a supportive manner. There are many factors that might affect a student’s willingness to hear and respond positively to feedback including experience, setting, and cultural considerations. You’ll also consider strategies for having difficult conversations.

By the end of this module, participants will be able to:

1. Explain the role of communication style in providing feedback effectively.

2. Anticipate some of the barriers to providing effective feedback including cultural differences.

3. Articulate specific strategies for ensuring open and productive communication between clinical educators and students.

Disclosures

Carol Cokely

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.

Non-Financial

None

Gina Tillard

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.  Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None

Kate Cook

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None.

Cheryl Messick

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Pittsburg.  At times receives compensation as a presenter/author in various venues on clinical education topics.

Non-Financial

Was a member of the CAPCSD board during course development.

ASHA CEU Credit

ASHA CEU Brand Block

 

 

 

 

This course is offered for 0.25 ASHA CEUs (Introductory level, Related area)

Module 5: Receiving Feedback from Your Students

 

This module will explore the importance of feedback from the perspective of the student to the clinical instructor. Receiving feedback from students can be challenging for some clinical instructors due to a variety of reasons. Students need to feel that their feedback is valued and that their clinical supervisor is open to learning the student’s perspective on what would help their learning. It is important to the learners’ development that an environment is created that allows students the opportunity to provide honest feedback. The resources in this module will highlight methods to foster the provision of feedback by students and tools to overcome potential difficulties for clinical instructors when receiving feedback.

By the end of this module, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of receiving feedback from a student regarding clinical teaching
  2. Give examples of the barriers and facilitators for receiving feedback from students
  3. Articulate specific strategies for receiving feedback

Disclosures

Carol Cokely

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.

Non-Financial

None

Gina Tillard

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD as an independent contractor.  Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None

Kate Cook

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Canterbury.

Non-Financial

None.

Cheryl Messick

 

Financial

Received compensation from CAPCSD
as an independent contractor. Receives a salary from the University of Pittsburg.  At times receives compensation as a presenter/author in various venues on clinical education topics.

Non-Financial

Was a member of the CAPCSD board during course development.

ASHA CEU Credit

ASHA CEU Brand Block

 

 

 

 

This course is offered for 0.25 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level, Related area)